English Chinese (Simplified)
GPG Key Revocation
When you revoke a key, you withdraw it from public use. _You should only have to do this if it is compromised or lost, or you forget the passphrase._
Generating a Revocation Certificate
When you create the key pair you should also create a key revocation certificate. If you later issue the revocation certificate, it notifies others that the public key is not to be used. Users may still use a revoked public key to verify old signatures, but not encrypt messages. As long as you still have access to the private key, messages received previously may still be decrypted. If you forget the passphrase, you will not be able to decrypt messages encrypted to that key.
gpg --output revoke.asc --gen-revoke KEYNAME
If you do not use the `--output` flag, the certificate will print to standard output.
For `KEYNAME`, substitute either the key ID of your primary keypair or any part of a user ID that identifies your keypair. Once you create the certificate (the `revoke.asc` file), you should protect it. If it is published by accident or through the malicious actions of others, the public key will become unusable. It is a good idea to write the revocation certificate to secure removable media or print out a hard copy for secure storage to maintain secrecy.
Revoking a key
Revoke the key locally:
gpg --import revoke.asc
Once you locally revoke the key, you must send the revoked certificate to a keyserver, regardless of whether the key was originally issued in this way. Distribution through a server helps other users to quickly become aware the key has been compromised.
Export to a keyserver with the following command:
gpg --keyserver hkp://pgp.mit.edu --send-keys KEYNAME
For `KEYNAME`, substitute either the key ID of your primary keypair or any part of a user ID that identifies your keypair.