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You can also use the [option]`-v` command line option to display more verbose output, or [option]`-vv` for very verbose output:
You can also use the [option]`-v` command line option to display more verbose output:
You can also use the [option]`-v` command line option to display more verbose information, or [option]`-vv` to increase the verbosity level even further:
You can also use the [command]#ps# command in a combination with [command]#grep# to see if a particular process is running. For example, to determine if [application]*Emacs* is running, type:
You can also use the above command with the [option]`-p` and [option]`-o udev` command line options to obtain more detailed information. Note that `root` privileges are required to run this command:
You can also end a process by selecting it from the list and clicking the btn:[End Process] button.
You can also choose to list only file systems of a particular type. To do so, add the [option]`-t` command line option followed by a file system type:
xref:System_Monitoring_Tools.adoc#interactive-top-command[Interactive top commands] contains useful interactive commands that you can use with [command]#top#. For more information, refer to the *top*(1) manual page.
… where _user_ is a username and _OID_ is the SNMP tree to provide access to. By default, the Net-SNMP Agent Daemon allows only authenticated requests (the [option]`auth` option). The [option]`noauth` option allows you to permit unauthenticated requests, and the [option]`priv` option enforces the use of encryption. The [option]`authpriv` option specifies that requests must be authenticated and replies should be encrypted.
… where _name_ is an identifying string for the extension, _prog_ is the program to run, and _args_ are the arguments to give the program. For instance, if the above shell script is copied to `/usr/local/bin/check_apache.sh`, the following directive will add the script to the SNMP tree:
… where _community_ is the community string to use, _source_ is an IP address or subnet, and _OID_ is the SNMP tree to provide access to. For example, the following directive provides read-only access to the `system` tree to a client using the community string "redhat" on the local machine:
When `getMode` returns `MODE_GET`, the handler analyzes the value of the `getOID` call on the `request` object. The `value` of the `request` is set to either `string_value` if the OID ends in ".1.0", or set to `integer_value` if the OID ends in ".1.1". If the `getMode` returns `MODE_GETNEXT`, the handler determines whether the OID of the request is ".1.0", and then sets the OID and value for ".1.1". If the request is higher on the tree than ".1.0", the OID and value for ".1.0" is set. This in effect returns the "next" value in the tree so that a program like [command]#snmpwalk# can traverse the tree without prior knowledge of the structure.
view your processes,
view the files opened by a selected process, and
view process dependencies,
view only active processes,
Viewing Memory Usage
Viewing Hardware Information
Viewing CPU Usage
Viewing Block Devices and File Systems